LOLA reduces transmission delays, or latency, to roughly 35 milliseconds. To the musicians’ ears, that’s like being on the same stage.

Technology that allows musicians in different places to perform together in real time was dramatically demonstrated Oct. 2 in Philadelphia, where a violinist and cellist hundreds of miles apart played a duet as if they were on the same stage.

More than 600 engineers, researchers, and scientists jumped to their feet and cheered after the performance at the Internet2 fall member meeting at a downtown hotel.

Violinist Marjorie Bagley, on stage in Philadelphia, and cellist Cheng-Hou Lee, projected on a video screen in DeKalb, Ill., performed the tricky Handel-Halvorsen Passacaglia for cello and violin to show off LOLA. That’s the nickname for the low-latency audio and video conferencing software developed by researchers from the G. Tartini Music Conservatory in Trieste, Italy, and the Italian Research & Education Network.

Bagley said afterward that the long-distance duet didn’t seem that way when she was performing.

“It feels very up close and personal,” she said.

LOLA reduces transmission delays, or latency, to roughly 35 milliseconds. To the musicians’ ears, that’s like being on the same stage. Typical delays on current audiovisual networks can be more than 200 milliseconds—far too long for collaborations that need to be in perfect sync with the most subtle aspects of a musical performance.

NIU demonstrates its groundbreaking video technology for Internet 2

 

The technology is creating “a global conservatory, enabling our students … access to artists, coaches, mentors around the world,” said Roberto Diaz, president of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, which has begun working with LOLA.


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