Ferolo’s academic research looks into how people use mobile devices in their everyday lives and how the technology affects their experiences.

“If people are physically here, the video content becomes more relevant to them. I believe there is a higher engagement in that tour,” he said.

Stacy Bernstein, 17, a high school senior who was visiting Bradley from St. Louis, said the videos provided insight that she didn’t get by staring at limestone buildings.

“There is stuff you don’t really see walking around,” she said.

Ryan Osmolski, a 17-year-old from Peotone, Ill., also thought the iPads were a nice touch, as did his mom, Karen.

“Once they fine-tune it, it will be even more beneficial,” she said. “They could add more videos.”

The university does plan to produce more videos, and students will be able to pick which to watch based on their academic and extracurricular interests.

There’s discussion about adding a post-tour survey and an “early estimator” so students can learn what a Bradley education will cost.

Current Bradley students looked curiously at the iPad-toting tour participants.

“I wish we used iPads on my tour,” sophomore Jackie Kraynak commented to a friend as they worked on a class presentation in the library. “Our tour wasn’t like that.”

(c)2011 the Chicago Tribune. Visit the Chicago Tribune at www.chicagotribune.com. Distributed by MCT Information Services.


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