Misericordia University, a 2,300-student campus in Dallas, Pa., was at the forefront of QR code use in American higher education, using the technology in campus paper materials since 2008.

The university recently sent print material to prospective students that included a QR code they could scan with their smart phone and watch a YouTube video of a typical day of a Misericordia student.

QR codes aren’t universally recognized yet, but college students are sure to gravitate toward the black-and-white boxes once they’ve snapped a few pictures and experienced the technology’s convenience, said Stephanie Geyer, director of web development for Noel-Levitz, an Iowa-based higher-education consulting company.

“The beauty of using a QR code on a flier, pamphlet, booklet, or anywhere else in higher education is that it creates a bridge between real-world material and online resources,” Geyer wrote in a blog post. “There’s no need for students to memorize the address for your event’s webpage or search around your school’s website looking for more information. Just point, snap and connect instantly.”


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