Report tracks post-bachelor’s degree progress


Twenty-three percent of 2007-2008 first-time bachelor’s degree recipients majored in a business-related field, 16 percent majored in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM), 16 percent majored in a social science, and 12 percent majored in the humanities.

Roughly 20 percent had parents whose highest level of education was a high school diploma or less. And 44 percent completed a bachelor’s degree within 48 months of their initial enrollment, 23 percent completed their degree within 49-60 months, and 9 percent completed a degree within 61-72 months.

Sixty-two percent of graduates took out federal loans to finance their education, borrowing an average of $18,200 each. Thirty-six percent borrowed from state or private sources and took out an average of $13,900 in loans.

Sixty-seven percent of bachelor’s degree students who initially enrolled in public two-year institutions borrowed an average of $24,500 to finance their education, while 85 percent of students in private nonprofit and for-profit two-year institutions borrowed an average of $31,600.

Sixty-two percent of students who initially enrolled in a public four-year institution borrowed an average of $21,900; 69.4 percent of students at private nonprofit institutions borrowed an average of $27,900 in loans; and 87.7 percent of students in for-profit schools took out an average of $36,000 in loans.

Thirty percent of the first-time bachelor’s degree recipients had enrolled in another education program, or had been accepted and planned to enroll in the 2009-2010 academic year, which followed the interview date.