A poster in a gay-themed chat room who appears to have been Clementi said he unplugged Ravi’s computer and searched for hidden cameras before the second liaison.

Clementi had apparently complained to the university about his roommate, and Rutgers officials have said they did all they could.

The young man left a note on his Facebook page on Sept. 22 that read: “Jumping off the gw bridge sorry.”

Clementi was a promising violinist — and out to his parents, an attorney told The Associated Press on Wednesday — in his first weeks at college when he took his life.

His death came amid a string of high-profile suicides nationwide of young people who were gay or perceived to be gay.

Partly because of the way he killed himself — jumping off the George Washington Bridge into the Hudson River — his suicide became the tipping point and led to a national conversation about bullying.

President Barack Obama, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres and sex columnist Dan Savage talked publicly about his death, even videotaping statements, saying that young gays and lesbians need to know that life gets better after the torment of teen years.

New Jersey toughened its anti-bullying law in the months after Clementi’s suicide.

On Wednesday, gay rights activists cheered the indictment as an act of justice and a warning to would-be bullies.

“Without question, the indictment is in the best interests of justice and in the best interests of students across New Jersey, for their potential bullies will now think harder before demolishing another student’s life,” said Steven Goldstein of Garden State Equality.


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