“In order to really create a new category of devices, those devices are going to have to be far better at doing some key tasks,” he said. “We think we’ve got the goods. We think we’ve done it.”

Cost tempered some of the excitement surrounding the iPad’s release. Although the entry-level price of $499 was less than most analysts had anticipated, many in education remain skeptical that students or their schools will spend $500 for an unproven electronic reader, even if it comes with the web-browsing features of Apple’s latest release.

Jobs said the iPad—like the iPhone—would use AT&T’s 3G service to supplement its Wi-Fi connectivity. Technology experts had speculated that Apple would tap Verizon to provide the iPad’s connectivity after consistent customer complaints about AT&T service.

The iPad models that can connect to AT&T’s wireless network will cost more, however—$629, $729, and $829, depending on the amount of memory they have.

Material from the Associated Press was used in this report.

Links:

Apple iPad

New Media Consortium


Add your opinion to the discussion.