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Researchers vie for supercomputer access (continued)

Shibeshi’s TeraGrid computer simulations showed that certain kinds of plaque buildup in the arteries can be detected with blood tests. The supercomputer helped Shirbeshi—who began his research at Howard University—to show how blood flow and red blood cells react to different heart conditions.

A Canadian college student recently used TeraGrid-supported simulations to test the strength and durability of a range of materials, including those used in airplane landing gear.

Aaron Percival, a graduate student at Queens University in Ontario, Canada, used the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to create a simulation that tests the structure of a material by showing its reaction to a beam of radiation or X-ray.

The first TeraGrid machines were funded by a $45 million NSF grant that led to computers complete with 11.6 teraflops, disk-storage systems with capacities of more than 450 terabytes of data, visualization systems, and massive data collections.

NSF created the Office of Cyberinfrastructure in 2005 with $150 million in awards.

Link:

TeraGrid

About the Author:

Denny Carter

Dennis has covered higher education technology since April 2008, having interviewed some of the most recognized IT pros in U.S. colleges and universities. He is always updating eCampus News with the latest in pressing ed-tech issues, such as the growing i


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Researchers vie for supercomputer access (continued)

Shibeshi’s TeraGrid computer simulations showed that certain kinds of plaque buildup in the arteries can be detected with blood tests. The supercomputer helped Shirbeshi—who began his research at Howard University—to show how blood flow and red blood cells react to different heart conditions.

A Canadian college student recently used TeraGrid-supported simulations to test the strength and durability of a range of materials, including those used in airplane landing gear.

Aaron Percival, a graduate student at Queens University in Ontario, Canada, used the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to create a simulation that tests the structure of a material by showing its reaction to a beam of radiation or X-ray.

The first TeraGrid machines were funded by a $45 million NSF grant that led to computers complete with 11.6 teraflops, disk-storage systems with capacities of more than 450 terabytes of data, visualization systems, and massive data collections.

NSF created the Office of Cyberinfrastructure in 2005 with $150 million in awards.

Link:

TeraGrid


Add your opinion to the discussion.

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