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New electronic devices could interest schools (continued)

Sony Corp. said its 3-D sets will be out this summer. Some will come with glasses, while others will be “3-D ready,” which means that buyers will have to complement with a separate plug-in device and glasses for 3-D viewing.

LG Electronics Inc. said it will introduce 47-inch and 55-inch flat-panel TVs with 3-D capabilities in May. LG didn’t announce exact prices for its new sets. But Tim Alessi, director of product development at LG Electronics USA, said 3-D TV sets will likely cost $200 to $300 more than comparable flat-panel sets without 3-D capabilities, which already run more than $1,000.

Manufacturers aren’t counting on 3-D to take over instantly. Color TV and high definition caught on over many years. Like those earlier advances, 3-D programming requires upgrades throughout the TV and movie infrastructure, from shooting to editing to distribution. But as the technology evolves, and as more 3-D content becomes available, 3-D TVs could become technologies that schools might consider, too.

New cell phone tether

Losing a cell phone can be exasperating and expensive, something that could easily challenge already tight school budgets–but what if your phone could call out to you, letting you know it was about to be left behind?

Zomm, a newly minted consumer electronics company from Tulsa, Okla., believes this would cut down on disappearing handsets. At CES, the company showed off a small device that does just that.

The company’s device, also called Zomm, connects wirelessly with your phone via Bluetooth and sets off an alarm if you walk away from it.

The Zomm, which is about the size of an Oreo cookie, also includes a personal alarm that users can activate and a button that will call emergency services with your phone. It acts as a speaker phone and alerts users of incoming calls as well.
The product includes a rechargeable battery that can last for three days per charge and is expected to be available this summer for $80.

Laurie Penix, co-founder and president of Zomm, came up with the idea for the gadget earlier this year after a friend’s husband lost his third iPhone. She started the company with her husband, Henry Penix, who is also its CEO.

Link:

International Consumer Electronics Show

About the Author:

Laura Ascione

Laura Ascione is the Managing Editor, Content Services at eSchool Media. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland's prestigious Philip Merrill College of Journalism. When she isn't wrangling her two children, Laura enjoys running, photography, home improvement, and rooting for the Terps. Find Laura on Twitter: @eSN_Laura http://twitter.com/eSN_Laura


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New electronic devices could interest schools (continued)

Sony Corp. said its 3-D sets will be out this summer. Some will come with glasses, while others will be “3-D ready,” which means that buyers will have to complement with a separate plug-in device and glasses for 3-D viewing.

LG Electronics Inc. said it will introduce 47-inch and 55-inch flat-panel TVs with 3-D capabilities in May. LG didn’t announce exact prices for its new sets. But Tim Alessi, director of product development at LG Electronics USA, said 3-D TV sets will likely cost $200 to $300 more than comparable flat-panel sets without 3-D capabilities, which already run more than $1,000.

Manufacturers aren’t counting on 3-D to take over instantly. Color TV and high definition caught on over many years. Like those earlier advances, 3-D programming requires upgrades throughout the TV and movie infrastructure, from shooting to editing to distribution. But as the technology evolves, and as more 3-D content becomes available, 3-D TVs could become technologies that schools might consider, too.

New cell phone tether

Losing a cell phone can be exasperating and expensive, something that could easily challenge already tight school budgets–but what if your phone could call out to you, letting you know it was about to be left behind?

Zomm, a newly minted consumer electronics company from Tulsa, Okla., believes this would cut down on disappearing handsets. At CES, the company showed off a small device that does just that.

The company’s device, also called Zomm, connects wirelessly with your phone via Bluetooth and sets off an alarm if you walk away from it.

The Zomm, which is about the size of an Oreo cookie, also includes a personal alarm that users can activate and a button that will call emergency services with your phone. It acts as a speaker phone and alerts users of incoming calls as well.
The product includes a rechargeable battery that can last for three days per charge and is expected to be available this summer for $80.

Laurie Penix, co-founder and president of Zomm, came up with the idea for the gadget earlier this year after a friend’s husband lost his third iPhone. She started the company with her husband, Henry Penix, who is also its CEO.

Link:

International Consumer Electronics Show


Add your opinion to the discussion.

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