News

Broadcasters’ woes could spell trouble for free TV

By Meris Stansbury
December 29th, 2009

For more than 60 years, TV stations have broadcast news, sports and entertainment for free and made their money by showing commercials, the Associated Press reports. That might not work much longer. The business model is unraveling at ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, and the local stations that carry the networks’ programming. Cable TV and the web have fractured the audience for free TV and siphoned its ad dollars. The recession has squeezed advertising further, forcing broadcasters to accelerate their push for new revenue to pay for programming. That will play out in living rooms across the country. The changes could mean higher cable or satellite TV bills, as the networks and local stations squeeze more fees from pay-TV providers such as Comcast and DirecTV for the right to show broadcast TV channels in their lineups. The networks might even ditch free broadcast signals in the next few years. Instead, they could operate as cable channels–a move that could spell the end of free TV as Americans have known it since the 1940s.

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About the Author:

Meris Stansbury

Meris Stansbury is the Editorial Director for both eSchool News and eCampus News, and was formerly the Managing Editor of eCampus News. Before working at eSchool Media, Meris worked as an assistant editor for The World and I, an online curriculum publication. She graduated from Kenyon College in 2006 with a BA in English, and enjoys spending way too much time either reading or cooking.


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Broadcasters’ woes could spell trouble for free TV

By Meris Stansbury
December 29th, 2009

For more than 60 years, TV stations have broadcast news, sports and entertainment for free and made their money by showing commercials, the Associated Press reports. That might not work much longer. The business model is unraveling at ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, and the local stations that carry the networks’ programming. Cable TV and the web have fractured the audience for free TV and siphoned its ad dollars. The recession has squeezed advertising further, forcing broadcasters to accelerate their push for new revenue to pay for programming. That will play out in living rooms across the country. The changes could mean higher cable or satellite TV bills, as the networks and local stations squeeze more fees from pay-TV providers such as Comcast and DirecTV for the right to show broadcast TV channels in their lineups. The networks might even ditch free broadcast signals in the next few years. Instead, they could operate as cable channels–a move that could spell the end of free TV as Americans have known it since the 1940s.

Click here for the full story

About the Author:

Meris Stansbury

Meris Stansbury is the Editorial Director for both eSchool News and eCampus News, and was formerly the Managing Editor of eCampus News. Before working at eSchool Media, Meris worked as an assistant editor for The World and I, an online curriculum publication. She graduated from Kenyon College in 2006 with a BA in English, and enjoys spending way too much time either reading or cooking.


Add your opinion to the discussion.

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