The University System of Maryland has defied a request from state lawmakers to create a policy regulating the display of pornographic films on its campuses, concluding that such a move would provoke costly free-speech lawsuits, reports the Baltimore Sun. A pornography policy also would place undue financial and administrative burdens on the system’s campuses, the Board of Regents said in explaining its decision. It’s unclear whether the board’s vote will bring reprisal from the state legislature, which made the request after uproar over the scheduled screening of the XXX-rated film "Pirates II: Stagnetti’s Revenge" in April on the UM-College Park campus. Republican Sen. Andy Harris tried unsuccessfully to amend the state budget so that public universities could not access their funding unless they developed a pornography policy. The General Assembly ultimately passed a nonbinding resolution telling the university system to come up with a policy, but no penalties were specified for failing to comply. UM officials assumed they could scout around for policies from other states and draft language based on those. But they discovered that Maryland would be the first state in the nation to pass a pornography policy for its public campuses. That played a role in the board’s shift against creating the policy, which would have required that any display of pornographic films be accompanied by educational programs…

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