Although he doesn’t believe crowdsourcing would be beneficial in his school of sixth through 12th graders, Ronnie Stewart, headmaster at York Prep School in Manhattan, said he can see it potentially working at the university level.

“It’s all about the teacher. If a teacher can control [his or her] classroom,” crowdsourcing grades could work, he said.

Davidson said the blog about her class has received a lot of attention, and she’s gotten many comments from people who think she’s just trying to get out of grading, but she described many of those comments as being thoughtless.

In fact, the class’s first assignment will be for Davidson’s students to read her blogs on the course and all of the commentary that came from it.

“Dozens of comments are just each person being snarkier than the last, and after five comments [in one thread] you can tell that the person hasn’t even read the original post, they’re just riffing off of the comments,” she said. “That’s what this class is about–the consequences of writing that snarky comment.”

Link:

“How to Crowdsource Grading”


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