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Colleges offer veterans-only classes to ease transition

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West Virginia University offers veterans courses in history, public speaking, and on transitioning from military to student life.

The students in the Saturday morning class trickle in and, as they introduce themselves around a table, reveal far more intimate biographies than just name and hometown.

One confesses to demons he struggles to control. Another says he’s here to find a community. “Forgive me,” an Iraq war veteran begins haltingly. “I have to use notes. I have a brain injury.”

The students are participants in a veterans writing seminar at George Washington University, where for two days they immerse themselves in the basics of the craft and learn how to plumb for therapeutic and creative purposes their experiences in places like Iraq, Bosnia, and Vietnam. The class is a non-credit weekend seminar open to veterans and their relatives, but the university plans to adapt the model soon into a for-credit, semester-long course for student veterans.

The seminar is part of a trend of veterans-only courses offered at colleges and universities, part of a concerted effort to cater to a population that tends to be older, more experienced, and farther removed from the classroom than traditional undergraduates.

Introductory courses on campus life help veterans navigate the unfamiliar terrain of a college environment, while academic classes set aside for veterans are designed to help them learn in smaller settings and alongside peers with similar backgrounds. The courses are often peppered with military references and sometimes taught by fellow veterans.

“Different institutions are using veterans-specific courses for a variety of reasons, but largely it has to do with ensuring that veterans have a smooth and comfortable transition from the military culture into the civilian culture,” said Meg Mitcham, director of veterans programs at the American Council on Education (ACE), a higher-education association.

Still, not all courses have had staying power. It’s not simple to find courses that appeal broadly to veterans of different ages and generations. Not all veterans seek to identify themselves as such, and there’s not universal agreement that veteran-oriented classes are the best way to acclimate a group that already might feel isolated.

Michael Dakduk, executive director of Student Veterans of America, said that while there are obvious benefits to the model, he’s also heard some say: “Does it necessarily help with re-reintegration, and specially integration into a college campus, if they’re being removed from the student population?”

The courses are but one example of services that colleges are offering to a surge of veterans who have enrolled after the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill, which expanded tuition benefits. An ACE survey found that 62 percent of the 690 colleges and universities that responded provide programs and services, including post-traumatic-stress counseling and specially trained staff. The Department of Veterans Affairs says 441,710 veterans and eligible beneficiaries are enrolled this fall in educational programs using Post 9/11 G.I. Bill benefits.

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